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Zachary Richard interviewing Louis Michot

Accession No.: 
AC3-001

Episode 1: Louis Michot - Regeneration

00:44 - Welcome to "La Roue qui pend" (The Hanging Wheel)
00:55 - Speaking about the survival of Louisiana's French language and how Louis Michot is helping to keep it alive
01:55 - The Louis Michot Regeneration (The Lost Bayou Ramblers playing "High Society")
03:00 - Zachary meets Louis and friends/family (Jon Bertrand, Andre Michot, Ashlee Michot)
04:42 - Zachary, Louis, and others start playing music
05:40 - Zachary asks Louis how important it is for him and the younger generation to keep Cajun French and music alive
06:09 - Louis singing with others playing in the background
06:25 - Louis talks about his past with Cajun music and seeing its growing popularity
06:39 - Talks about the lyrics of Cajun French songs and what they mean to him and for others of Cajun descent
07:27 - Traveling to "La Roue qui pend" (The Hanging Wheel)
07:47 - Shows the hanging wheel and explains what it was used for
07:54 - Louis talks about stories he has heard of "Cajun Gypsies"
09:15 - Zachary and Louis arrive at Ethel Mae Bourque's house (the woman who inspired Louis)
10:45 - Ethel Mae Bourque starts singing at the dinner table as the others listen and eat gumbo
12:15 - Scenes of flooding in the area
12:35 - Zachary asks Louis if preserving a pure version of Cajun French is important to him
13:59 - Louis plays the fiddle while Ethel Mae Bourque sings
15:23 - Louis talks about having friends that speak French with him and how he has to convince older Cajuns to speak French with him
16:39 - Louis playing and singing in the Blue Moon Saloon
16:55 - Louis talks about the singers that want to learn French to understand what they are singing
17:29 - Playing music at a crawfish boil
18:40 - Louis and his girlfriend (Now wife, Ashlee) talking about how French brought them together
21:00 - Georgette LeBlanc talking about life in Louisiana

Language: 
English
French
Media Type: 
Video
Collection: 
Acadia North and South Collection
Subject: 
Cajun, French, Louisiana, Music, ballads
Creator: 
Charles Larroque
Recording date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Coverage Spatial: 
Broussard, LA
Publisher: 
Louisiane à la carte
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
26 Minutes
Cataloged Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Digitized Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Original Format: 
DVD
Digital Format: 
MP4
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore - Cabinet 2 Shelf 3

Zachary Richard interviewing Raynald Basque

Accession No.: 
AC3-002

Episode 2: Raynald Basque - Chameleon Man


00:45 - Zachary Richard begins by talking about Raynald Basque
02:17 - Zachary describes Raynald
02:45 - Rejean Comeau and Glenda LeBlanc describe Tracadie
03:04 - Group discusses what city to compare Tracadie to and how they preserve the culture, history, and language
04:45 - Talks about how people thought they were crazy for wanting to fly the Acadian flag at town hall
05:55 - Raynald points out a church that belonged to his ancestors and talks about his family history
07:15 - Raynald speaks about how he feels when he paints (shows him painting)
08:11 - Raynald speaks of his ancestors
09:55 - Raynald tries to define what he is and explains why people do not like him
11:18 - Raynald singing at outside venue
12:10 - Raynald introduces people at the outside venue to the camera
13:00 - Talks about how many different types of people there are in Tracadie
14:56 - Shows Raynald diving for clams
16:53 - Zachary and Raynald talk about the suffering of their ancestors
18:00 - Raynald talks about the difference between his ancestors and their suffering and the artists that live in Tracadie now
18:25 - Excerpt from "Liberateur Libere" Productions Cojak
20:03 - Filming of "Les Bootleggers de l'Atlantique" Productions Cojak

Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Video
Collection: 
Acadia North and South Collection
Creator: 
Charles Larroque
Recording date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Coverage Spatial: 
Tracadie, New Brunswick
Publisher: 
Louisiane à la carte
Meta Information
Duration: 
26 Minutes
Cataloged Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Digitized Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Original Format: 
CD
Digital Format: 
MP4
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore - Cabinet 2 Shelf 3

Zachary Richard interviewing Angus LeFort

Accession No.: 
AC3-003

Episode 3: Angus LeFort - Acadian Highlander

00:48 - Zachary Richard talking about the challenges that the Acadians faced
02:05 - Talking about where the Acadians came from to leave the prosecution behind
02:42 - Angus LeFort begins speaking about the land that his family lived on called "La Rigoueche"
04:08 - Angus stops at wayside signs that explain what the area called "Cap Rouge" used to look like and who used the land
04:46 - Angus describes how he uses history for the future, not to be stuck in the past
05:50 - Zachary askes Angus what it means to be Acadian, Angus answers
06:50 - Shows the CKJM, 106.1FM building
07:12 - Talks about the Acadian fishermen
07:25 - Angus is a builder of culture, talks about how he owns and runs the radio station
08:18 - Shows a live show on the CKJM, DJ interviews Zachary Richard (talks about the connection between Nova Scotia and Louisiana)
09:20 - Zachary and Angus talking about what Angus wants to accomplish with Cajun Music
09:50 - Walk through the museum gallery held in the radio building
10:30 - Begins talking about the crocheted rugs that can be found all over the world
11:16 - Gives a demonstration of how to make the rugs
12:31 - Shows the control room where the Acadian music is recorded
12:48 - Sylvia Lelievre singing
14:59 - Begin talking about how many Acadians are in the area
15:00 - Talk about the difference between an Acadian school and a Francophone school
16:00 - Begins talking about Acadian families being displaced in order to make a National Park
20:20 - Shows Angus and family sitting around the dinner table (family is described as another pillar of Acadian culture)

Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Video
Collection: 
Acadia North and South Collection
Subject: 
Acadian Expulsion, Acadie, Louisiana, French, Nova Scotia
Creator: 
Charles Larroque
Recording date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Coverage Spatial: 
Cheticamp, Nova Scotia
Publisher: 
Louisiane à la carte
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
26 Minutes
Cataloged Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Digitized Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Original Format: 
CD
Digital Format: 
MP4
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore - Cabinet 2 Shelf 3

Zachary Richard interviewing Sandra LeCouteur

Accession No.: 
AC3-004

Episode 4: Sandra LeCouteur - Island Girl
00:50 - Zachary Richard talks about the Acadians love for music
02:11 - Zachary explains the history of one of the Acadian songs (a girl found a note in a bottle and turned the note into a song)
03:10 - Zachary talks about Miscou being apart from the rest of the world until something like finding this bottle happened
04:00 - Sandra LeCouteur recording a song
04:48 - Sandra on a fishing boat with others
05:30 - Zachary asks Sandra about her history with singing
07:18 - Zachary explains that Sandra is a good example of a Miscou girl and explains what that means
07:20 - Scenes of Sandra and her father, Hiran LeCouteur, digging for clams
09:50 - Sandra talks about her love of words and her history with them. She also talks about the Acadians' small vocabulary
10:44 - Sandra recording a song
10:58 - Zachary talks about Sandra remembering her island in her music
11:26 - Sandra discusses the Miscou fog horn and how it sounds like it's in her song
12:00 - Sandra singing
12:25 - Sandra talks about her sons and how because of them she stopped believing in organized religion
13:30 - Sandra singing
14:08 - Sandra begins singing in a church
14:15 - Sandra explains that the church is the Miscou church and talks about her history with this church
14:50 - Sandra talks about singing and crying for all the ones that have died and are now buried in the church cemetery
15:16 - Sandra sings the song that is sang at the end of all of the funerals ("Beautiful Heaven" / "Beau Ciel")
17:00 - Sandra singing
17:35 - She talks about what she feels like when she is on stage
17:57 - Sandra singing
20:31 - At a clam bake talking about her time at the light house
21:44 - Sandra singing while people eat and play music
22:42 - Zachary speaks of Sandra and all of her good qualities
23:43 - Festival Acadien de Caraquet, August 2002 (Sandra singing on stage)

Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Video
Collection: 
Acadia North and South Collection
Subject: 
Zachary Richard interviewing Sandra LeCouteur
Creator: 
Charles Larroque
Recording date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Coverage Spatial: 
Miscou Island, New Brunswick
Publisher: 
Louisiane à la carte
Meta Information
Duration: 
26 Minutes
Cataloged Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Digitized Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Original Format: 
CD
Digital Format: 
MP4
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore - Cabinet 2 Shelf 3

Zachary Richard interviewing Guy Côté

Accession No.: 
AC3-005

Episode 5: Guy Côté - Harbor Historian in Havre St. Pierre, Quebec
01:00 - Zachary Richard talks about the displacement of the Acadians over the years and how Guy Côté is interested in the history of what has happened to this group of people
02:25 - Guy Côté in the tourism center
02:40 - Zachary talking about how St. Pierre got its name and how well Guy Côté knows his areas.
03:01 - Guy explaining to a family where to go to see certain aspects of the area (like where to go to see puffins)
03:12 - Guy explains to Zachary how village elders know certain things that younger people are not aware of (example - older people use American words because in the past French was not used as much as it is today. Younger people speak more fluent French, showing that Acadian culture is changing)
04:14 - Zachary talks about Perroquet Island and how the houses and light house on the island mean a lot to Guy Côté. They are a driving force to his interest in the history of his people
04:40 - Guy leads a tour explaining Placide Vigneault and his writings (he wrote about the lives of the Acadians and not just the deportation of them)
05:20 - Guy explains that the houses on the island where built for families
05:26 - Old picture of couple sitting on object in front of the light house
05:29 - Old picture of men of all ages standing around the porch on one of the houses
05:33 - Guy talks about the children that lived on the island
05:45 - Old picture of Placide Vigneault; Guy explains that Placide would keep old journals of life on the island (he would write about new bird species or the changing of fruits and vegetables that would grow in the garden; Placide's writings show the evolution of things and connect them to Acadian culture)
06:54 - Guy explains that without Placide and his writings not much would be known about the Acadians day to day lives
09:30 - Guy and Zachary go searching for clams while Guy explains how the Acadians are looked at as different by other Canadians
10:17 - Zachary asks if there is a difference in quality of clams as the seasons change
10:59 - Someone demonstrates how to open the clam and then how long it takes to cook it (they explan and demonstrate that the clam can be eaten raw as well)
12:38 - Guy talks about the survival instinct way of life that still lingers from the old days
12:48 - He talks about the sharing of wealth to help each other out with everything from giving something to eat to moving into a new apartment together
14:09 - Guy explains what he sees in himself as a historian
15:26 - Guy and Simone Misson sings songs from their childhood
16:00 - They talk about the songs and what they meant to people of the past
16:36 - Simone sings a song of the "Wandering Jew" ("Juif errant")
17:40 - Guy explains that every person feels the need to fit into a group that is not just the familial group
19:00 - Guy leads a tour and points out interesting rock formations and relates them back to the Acadians (they are strong and time changes them but they are still rocks)
21:56 - Group singing
22:48 - Zachary thanks Guy Côté for allowing him into his community
14:09 - Guy explains what he sees in himself as a historian
15:26 - Guy and Simone Misson sings songs from their childhood
16:00 - They talk about the songs and what they meant to people of the past
16:36 - Simone sings a song of the "Wandering Jew"
17:40 - Guy explains that every person feels the need to fit into a group that is not just the familial group
19:00 - Guy leads a tour and points out interesting rock formations and relates them back to the Acadians (they are strong and time changes them but they are still rocks)
21:56 - Group singing
22:48 - Zachary thanks Guy for allowing him into his community

Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Video
Collection: 
Acadia North and South Collection
Subject: 
Zachary Richard interviewing Guy Côté
Creator: 
Charles Larroque
Recording date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Coverage Spatial: 
Havre St. Pierre, Quebec
Publisher: 
Louisiane à la carte
Rights Usage: 
All rights reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
26 Minutes
Cataloged Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Digitized Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Original Format: 
DVD
Digital Format: 
MP4
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore - Cabinet 2 Shelf 3

Zachary Richard interviewing J.P. LeBlanc

Accession No.: 
AC3-006

Episode 6: J.P. LeBlanc - Go, Johnny Go...

00:46 - Zachary Richard explains that Acadie should not be simplified into a stereotype; he introduces J. P. Lebland as a lover of blues

in Bathurst, New Brunswick

02:27 - Zachary describes how most kids do not know what they want from life at 19 but J.P. is different. He has a passion for music

03:21 - J.P. explains how he started off with music and where his interest with blues came about

04:36 - He talks about how he only knew of a few blues musicians to listen to for inspiration

05:04 - J.P. sings and plays guitar around a fire with friends

05:22 - J.P. plays and sings with band

06:10 - Zachary and J.P. talk about where he is playing on that night

06:25 - Zachary discusses how J.P.'s life revolves around eating, sleeping, and playing the guitar

07:08 - J.P. talks about his history with the guitar

07:44 - He talks about his band and how he thought if he played guitar then he has to write his own compositions

08:38 - J.P. singing with band

09:49 - J.P.'s dad, André Leblanc, talks about his history with J.P. and his music

10:52 - André talks about how J.P.'s style is always changing

11:33 - J.P. playing onstage with his band

12:11 - Zachary talks about J.P.'s relationship with his family

12:45 - Zachary asks if J.P. considers himself Acadian and what he thinks it means to be Acadian

13:40 - J.P. discusses his different taste in music that he's had for a while

14:16 - Zachary and J.P. play guitar together

14:40 - Zachary talks about how lucky J.P. is to have his father by his side the whole way through

15:14 - J.P. singing and playing with his band

16:15 - Andre talks about how he thinks J.P. is following his (André's) dreams of playing music and playing the guitar

17:54 - J.P. playing with band

21:55 - J.P. playing with band

Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Video
Collection: 
Acadia North and South Collection
Subject: 
Zachary Richard interviewing J.P. LeBlanc
Creator: 
Charles Larroque
Recording date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Coverage Spatial: 
Bathurst, New Brunswick
Publisher: 
Louisiane à la carte
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
26 Minutes
Cataloged Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Digitized Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Original Format: 
DVD
Digital Format: 
MP4
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore - Cabinet 2 Shelf 3

Zachary Richard interviewing Jimmie Meaux

Accession No.: 
AC3-007

Episode 7: Jimmie Meaux - Cowboys 'n Cajuns

00:55 - Zachary Richard describes how Cajuns are often times farmers and ranchers, like Jimmie Meaux

02:30 - Zachary explains that Jimmie is a fast talker

03:40 - Zachary asks if Jimmie's been a cowboy his whole life

03:44 - Jimmie tells the story of how he was born on a horse in the flood of 1940

05:07 - Zachary explains that below Jimmie's tough exterior there is a softer side

06:23 - Jimmie thinks that the Cajun culture in Louisiana will not last much longer because French is not being taught in the schools

07:29 - Jimmie starts singing with the band that's playing

08:50 - He talks about his heard of cattle

10:45 - He discusses they way he raises cattle and how people have told him that it is the future of the industry

13:25 - Jimmie demonstrates how his horse is trained; Zachary explains his ways of being a trainer

14:15 - Zachary explains that Jimmie lives by the seasons and the vaccination season is the most important

14:21 - Shows Jimmie and helpers trying to herd the cattle in order to vaccinate them

15:50 - Jimmie demonstrates how to worm the cattle

16:55 - Jimmie discusses how certain color cows sell for more than others

18:48 - Zachary asks Jimmie if he thinks that there is a future for ranching and farming in Louisiana

20:46 - Zachary playing and singing with others while other people eat

21:19 - Jimmie starts singing while Zach and others play

Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Video
Collection: 
Acadia North and South Collection
Subject: 
Zachary Richard interviewing Jimmie Meaux
Creator: 
Charles Larroque
Recording date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Publisher: 
Louisiane à la carte
Meta Information
Duration: 
26 Minutes
Cataloged Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Digitized Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Original Format: 
CD
Digital Format: 
MP4
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore - Cabinet 2 Shelf 3

Zachary Richard interviewing Jeannot Painchaud

Accession No.: 
AC3-008

Episode 8: Jeannot Painchaud - Ladies and Gentlemen...Kids of all Ages...

00:55 - Zachary Richard explains Jeannot Painchaud and the connection with the Acadians

02:25 - Zachary explains that Jeannot left to find adventure; he is now part of the circus and therefore is always traveling

05:32 - Shows some of the acts practicing while Jeannot explains why he got into the circus

07:13 - Zachary explains why the Acadians ended up on the Magdalen Islands

08:14 - Man explains the name of the circus "Le Cirque Éloize"

08:58 - Jeannot explains his experience with the circus and what it is like performing in an actual big top

10:11 - Shows his trailer with his family inside; he talks about how most Magdalen families have musicians in them and why that is

11:26 - Lucie Cauchon explains that music for a circus is different than regular music and explains why

12:17 - Jeannot explains how practice is different from the actual performance because the musicians are less stressed during the practices

13:20 - Ginette Painchaud talks about the performers and how they basically get to remain children by having fun with what they do

14:21 - Zachary talks to Jeannot about how he identifies himself

15:55 - Zachary talks about Jeannot's ties to his children and how his Acadian roots make it hard for him to be away from his family

16:52 - Jeannot talks about being a father and being available for his children

18:23 - Ginette talks about islanders showing up late to the show

19:00 - Shows performers getting ready for the show

22:49 - The show begins

23:02 - Zachary talks about the people of Magdalen Islands being distant but welcoming

Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Video
Collection: 
Acadia North and South Collection
Subject: 
Zachary Richard interviewing Jeannot Painchaud
Creator: 
Charles Larroque
Recording date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Coverage Spatial: 
Magdalen Islands
Publisher: 
Louisiane à la carte
Meta Information
Duration: 
26 Minutes
Cataloged Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Digitized Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Original Format: 
CD
Digital Format: 
MP4
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore - Cabinet 2 Shelf 3

Zachary Richard interviewing Carol Fran

Accession No.: 
AC3-009

Episode 9: Carol Fran - Bury My Heart with the Blues

00:50 - Zachary Richard explains that the careers of many musicians started in Crowley, Louisiana, including that of Carol Fran

02:15 - Zachary talks about other singers besides blues singers having suffered and using that pain to inspire their music

02:51 - Carol Fran singing (shows Carol getting ready in her room)

03:30 - Shows Carol singing in a dining hall

04:39 - Zachary asks if there was music in her family while she was growing, she talks about her history with music

05:59 - Carol Fran singing "Emmitt Lee" (1958) (shows Carol arriving at KRVS)

06:49 - Melvin Cesar interviewing Carol Fran on KRVS talk show

06:57 - Carol discusses when she started singing

07:13 - Carol singing "On the Battlefield for My Lord"

07:14 - Shows images of Laural Valley Plantation located in Thibodaux, LA

07:22 - Slave quarters at Laural Valley Plantation

07:47 - Shows Carol singing in the KRVS studios

08:03 - Zachary explains that Carol sings it all but she started with gospel

08:20 - Carol singing "On the Battfield for My Lord" in the KRVS studio

09:08 - Zachary talks to Carol about her childhood and her mother letting her sing in other places besides church to make money

10:05 - Carol Fran singing "I'm Gonna Try" (1965)

10:17 - Carol and friend, Willis Constantin, talk about getting old and old recipes

12:13 - Carol Fran singing "Knock Knock" (1959)

12:23 - Zachary talks to Carol about her neighborhood growing up and if a lot of French was spoken

13:04 - Carol talks about if her parents spoke French or not when she was young

13:10 - She begins talking about how the French and Creole language was different from town to town

13:49 - She talks about being able to tell the difference between the two languages

14:24 - Carol talks about taking care of her sister's son along with the rest of her family after her father died

16:32 - Carol Fran singing

17:22 - Carol Fran singing at the Cruiser's Club in Lafayette, LA

18:53 - She speaks about her family and their skin color. (She recounts about by called "pickaninny" by her cousins because of her dark skin)

20:38 - Carol Fran singing "Crying in the Chapel" (1965)

21:05 - As she walks through a cemetary she talks about the death of her loved ones

22:55 - Zachary thanks Carol for everything she has done in her life

Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Video
Collection: 
Acadia North and South Collection
Subject: 
Zachary Richard interviewing Carol Fran
Creator: 
Charles Larroque
Recording date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Coverage Spatial: 
Crowley, LA
Publisher: 
Louisiane à la carte
Meta Information
Duration: 
26 Minutes
Cataloged Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Digitized Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Original Format: 
CD
Digital Format: 
MP4
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore - Cabinet 2 Shelf 3

Zach Richard interviewing Marc Cormier

Accession No.: 
AC3-010

Episode 10: Marc Cormier - In God's Country

00:50 Zach Richard explains that even though the Acadians were pushed to the edge of the world people like Marc Cormier fight to keep the culture alive for him and the people of the future

02:29 Zach talks about how Cape St. George is so much like Louisiana with the Acadian Culture at rick because of assimilation

04:10 Zach and Marc walk to "La Grosse de Reblais," Marc tells Zach stories of his father climbing down the steep cliffs to gather seagull eggs for breakfast

05:40 Marc talks about teaching kids at school about the Francophone and Acadian Culture and hoping to instill a pride in them

06:27 Leon Dube singing French song

07:01 Zach explains that older people in Newfoundland feel alone because they are some of the last people that speak French (Zach relates this back to Louisiana)

07:56 Arthur Kurfant talks about having 22 siblings. And how during his father's time everyone spoke French but now that's gone

09:39 Marc speaks with Emmanuel Simon about his choices in staying on the Cape instead of leaving like everyone else

10:48 Zach explains another common trait between Louisiana and Newfoundland, the people of each area are fighting to keep their culture alive no matter what

11:28 Marcella Cormier talks about being a minority in more ways than one because of the way they speak French and English

12:17 Marc talks about a professor that came to Newfoundland to study their dialect. When the professor told Marc that the language they had was special Marc knew he had to do something in order to keep the future interested in learning it.

13:25 Marcella talks about the tramatic experience of going to an English school and how she knew it was not for her

15:11 Zach talks about how it's up to the children to keep the language going (most of the children speak English at home and between themselves. They only get French if they attend the French speaking school)

15:58 Marc talks about his daughter, Marcella, in a proud way. He explains that he loves that she follows in his footsteps to hopefully keep the French language going in their area

17:35 Zach speaks with children about assimilation (whether they speak French or English at home or with their friends)

19:53 Marc talks about his people being in Newfoundland for over 500 years but people do not realize this like he wishes they would

20:50 Marc and Zach talk about music in the area and how young people do not really play instruments but Marc is trying to implement into schools a program to get kids interested

 

Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Video
Collection: 
Acadia North and South Collection
Subject: 
Zach Richard interviewing Marc Cormier
Creator: 
Charles Laroque
Recording date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Coverage Spatial: 
Cape St. George, Newfoundland
Publisher: 
Louisiane a la carte
Meta Information
Duration: 
26 Minutes
Cataloged Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Digitized Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Original Format: 
CD
Digital Format: 
MP4
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore

Zach Richard interviewing Ophelia Lefort

Accession No.: 
AC3-011

Episode 11: The Treasures of Ophelia Lefort

00:54 Zach talks about stories of pirates and treasure that Ophelia Lefort's father would tell her when she was younger

02:00 Zach talks about the land that Ophelia lives on and how it's filled with treasures of all kinds

02:38 Zach and Ophelia talk about where she was born and raised

03:00 She talks about her parents and how they never spoke English

03:46 She first came in contact with English in school (she discusses being punished for speaking French in school)

04:49 She discusses only being able to speak French, she cannot read or write it

05:41 Zach talks about Ophelia with her friends and family enjoying get togethers and how she always has a stockpile of cypress knees to make into art

06:12 Ophelia and her friend, Millie Gisclair, discuss how to prepare the knees to be painted

06:42 She demonstrates how to boil the knees

07:37 Zach talks about the Chene a Caouenne (Caouenne's Oak) in Golden Meadow, LA and how it is a place for people to gather to help each other and for them to gossip or tell stories like those about Jean Lafitte

09:00 Woman shows a painting of a group of people sitting around the Chene a Caouenne by Delores Granger

09:38 Group exchanges stories about their weddings and marriages

11:13 Ophelia talks about always wanting to better herself and to do better than her siblings (that included knowing two languages, French and English)

12:18 She talks about moving to Lafayette in 1946 and 1947 with her husband and loving it because people spoke French there

14:21 Zach talks about when Ophelia was a child. She, with other, would run down to the dock where the grocery boat was and the sailors would throw treats over to the kids. Now those kids are grown up but they still enjoy taking trips down that bayou.

14:59 Ebdon Barrios talks the area being a melting pot of people and culture. He says that it is due to Jean Lafitte

15:59 Former Sheriff Duffy Breaux explains that even though there are a lot of different people in the area French remained the main language because of a lack of education within the immigrant communities

16:17 Ebdon explains that when he started school he did not know a word of English and that he was forced to learn the language

17:47 Zach and Ophelia talk about her father telling stories and how the gift was passed down to her

18:00 She starts telling a story that her father told her about Jean Lafitte

19:18 Ophelia also discusses that her father would sing to her and begins to sing a little bit of a song

20:01 Ophelia standing next to the Jean Lafitte oak starts to talk about the treasure that is supposed to be burried under the tree

20:54 She starts about painting and how peaceful it can be

21:47 Woman starts singing an old French song

22:30 Zach talks about how the tree itself is a treasure no matter what or who is burried under it

Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Video
Collection: 
Acadia North and South Collection
Subject: 
Zach Richard interviewing Ophelia Lefort
Creator: 
Charles Laroque
Recording date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Coverage Spatial: 
West Pearl River, LA
Publisher: 
Louisiane a la carte
Meta Information
Duration: 
26 Minutes
Cataloged Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Digitized Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Original Format: 
CD
Digital Format: 
MP4
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore

Zach Richard interviewing Bernard Landry

Accession No.: 
AC3-012

Episode 12: Bernard Landry's Natashquan

00:52 Zach explains that the Acadians are a people of words no matter written, spoken, or through song. Bernard Landry is one of those people that keeps his culture alive by writing down the words of his ancestors for future generations

02:36 Zach explains that Natashquen means "place where bear are hunted" but now the land is not as bountiful.

03:22 Zach and Bernard talk about memory of their forefathers being the only thing left and how important it is to preserve that for future generations

03:29 They point out the bay where all of the fishermen would come and dock their boats to unload. Zach and Bernard also discuss what was done to the fish and how it was a big event when the boats docked

04:48 Bernard shows Zach a building where fishing materials would have been stored

05:10 Zach talks about how these shacks mean so much to people of Natashquan but that it takes more than memory to keep a culture alive

05:48 Zach and Bernard walk through the interpretive center that was built and is ran by Bernard. In the center one sees the past of the fishing industry of the area and the memories of the people that lived there

07:09 Zach talks about how hard it is to tune instruments in the climate of Natashquan

07:51 Zach speaks and plays guitar with Hermenegilde Vigneault

08:34 Zach plays accordion

8:51 A group plays

09:23 Bernard talks about loving the people of his town and his culture. He gets stories from the people so that he can exhibit them for others to learn from the stories

09:48 Zach talks about the difference between Louisiana music and the music of Natashquan and also the difference between the accents when speaking French

11:13 Singing song

11:33 Zach talks about how at night all of the people come together to share their music. The place is full of life which is different than what it looks like during the day

13:00 Bernard talks about the pride in the Acadian culture and how he hopes that even with so few jobs in the area, it will become wealthy again

14:14 singing song

15:02 Jean-Claude Landry points out where the Acadians landed 150 years ago then he and Bernard start talking about the history of the area

16:35 Zach talks about even though the Acadians all landed in different areas two things remain the same: hospitality and the love of good food

17:26 Jean-Claude shows Zach how to eat crab legs

18:25 Jean-Claude tells the story of seeing a whale when he was out fishing

20:51 Bernard talks about making yourself happy

21:29 singing song

22:50 Zach and Bernard arrive at a home for a meal, Zach starts talking about how welcoming the people are and how it reminds him of his family

Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Video
Collection: 
Acadia North and South Collection
Subject: 
Zach Richard interviewing Bernard Landry
Creator: 
Charles Laroque
Recording date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Publisher: 
Louisiane a la carte
Meta Information
Duration: 
26 Minutes
Cataloged Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Digitized Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Original Format: 
CD
Digital Format: 
MP4
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore

Zach Richard interviewing Marcel Arsenault

Accession No.: 
AC3-013

Episode 13: Marcel Arsenault - Acadia in Miniature

00:58 Zach Richard explains that the deportation of Acadians was meant to wipe out the people but instead it allowed the culture to spread across North America and has allowed the culture to live on in the hearts of many like Marcel Arsenault

02:08 Zach heads to Quebec and questions whether or not he is heading to Acadia

03:04 Zach and Marcel discuss uncovering Acadian documents and what it means to be acadian

03:45 Zach asks what one gets out of claiming to be Acadian and what that means in everyday life

05:05 Marcel talks about being nice to others and giving not expecting to recieve

05:54 Zach and Marcel talk about how long it takes him to make a miniature church

06:14 Marcel gives a demonstration on how to make different materials for the small town

06:35 Zach asks Marcel what made him start this hobby

07:07 Marcel gives demonstration on how to build things

07:47 They discuss the dimensions of different houses

08:14 Zach asks Marcel how he gets the measurements for the small structures

09:09 Marcel explains that taking photos is a hobby of his that helps with his crafts

10:50 Zach and Marcel walk around the small town that he created

11:52 They look at the firehouse and Marcel explains the structure

12:17 They look at the general store

12:40 Looks at Marcel's father's furniture store

13:02 Shows a replica of the house that Marcel was born in

13:10 Marcel explains that all farms were self-sufficient farms with a summer kitchen and moving the stove into the house in the winter so that the kitchen did not have to be warmed all winter

13:40 Zach talks about the craftsmenship work that goes into each building, Marcel explains that it is like his therapy

14:53 Marcel explains that the Acadians relied heavily on the Micmac Indians to survive the winter when they arrived

15:40 They discuss how the Acadians got to the Bonaventure area in order to settle the area

15:56 Marcel discusses how he's proud to be Acadian and proud of his forefathers

16:33 Marcel welcomes Zach to a gathering to eat and enjoy good company

17:48 A man plays the sax while Marcel cooks

20:12 Zach plays the piano as man plays the sax

 

Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Video
Collection: 
Acadia North and South Collection
Subject: 
Zach Richard interviewing Marcel Arsenault
Creator: 
Charles Laroque
Recording date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Coverage Spatial: 
Bonaventure, Quebec
Publisher: 
Louisiane a la carte
Meta Information
Duration: 
26 Minutes
Cataloged Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Digitized Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Original Format: 
CD
Digital Format: 
MP4
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore

Zach Richard interviewing Josh Pitre

Accession No.: 
AC3-014

Episode 14: Josh Pitre - Houma, the Brave

00:55 Zach Richard talks about the relationship between the Native Americans and the first Acadian to settle in Louisiana
02:08 Two guys talk about a Native American Pow Wow in Alaska
02:57 Zach explains the different tribes of Louisiana and how their words can still be found in the culture of the area
03:36 Zach and Josh talk about catching turtles and how Josh’s family has a long line of fishermen
04:54 Zach asks Josh how he learned French and his history with the language
06:15 Shows Josh singing a Native American song and playing the drums
06:34 Zach talks about how the elders of the Houma tribe are looking to the younger people like Josh to help keep their culture alive and well
07:19 Josh speaks with Marina Serigny about which language she grew up with in Point-aux-Chenes
08:19 They talk about people pronouncing the same words differently depending on where they learned French
09:09 They talk about Josh’s grandparents and how they were treaters
09:43 Marina talks about being treated by Josh’s grandmother
10:13 Zach and Josh talk about things that Josh has learned from the tribe that can be applied to real life (like information about plants and trees)
10:33 Josh talks about passing traditions down to his children one day
11:21 Josh talks about how without your culture, you are just like everyone else
12:00 Josh, Lawrence Billiot, and Whitney Dardar discuss what roots would be used to treat different problems
13:21 Demonstrates how to use a banana tree leaf to help someone with a sun stroke
14:09 Scenes from a Pow Wow
14:44 Zach explains that the Houma tribe has never been recognized by the federal government, he explains that because of this they cannot get assistance or open a casino like other tribes in the state of Louisiana can
15:12 Josh talks about going to college to help his tribe and people like them
15:35 Curtis Hendon talks about how school was for him as a young Native American growing up
16:06 Curtis talks about how people used trapping as a way to make a living during this time until wearing fur became not in fashion anymore, Curtis also talks about the fishing industry for these people
17:46 Zach asks Josh about the relationship between Native Americans and the Acadians
18:54 Shows a family getting together at a crawfish boil
20:08 Josh talks about dying young and trying to accomplish everything that he can while he still can (while talking he demonstrates how to braid palm fronds)
21:40 Shows scenes from a Pow Wow

Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Video
Collection: 
Acadia North and South Collection
Subject: 
Zach Richard interviewing Josh Pitre
Creator: 
Charles Laroque
Recording date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Coverage Spatial: 
Bayou Lafourche, LA
Publisher: 
Louisiane a la carte
Meta Information
Duration: 
26 Minutes
Cataloged Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Digitized Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Original Format: 
CD
Digital Format: 
MP4
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore

Zach Richard interviewing Berthe Vigneau

Accession No.: 
AC3-015

Episode 15: The Islands of Berthe Vigeau

00:52 Zach Richard discusses how hard it is for people to stay in touch with their Acadian roots because of the country not existing anymore
02:34 Zach talks about the colors of the houses on the island
03:11 Zach and Berthe Vigeau discuss where she grew up on the island
03:46 Zach and Frederic Landry discuss the walrus that no longer can be found around the island because of overhunting
04:29 Zach and Frederic talk about the relationships/identification that still last between the Acadian people even though they were displaced to different parts of North America
05:28 Zach asks what Frederic would identify himself as first: Acadian/Magdalen Islander or Quebecker
06:00 Frederic discusses founding a museum in 1969 and how he flew the Acadian, the Quebec, and the Canadian flag all side by side
07:31 Berthe discusses how the Acadians would settle on the beaches because they were fishmen
07:55 She talks about her parents and grandparent’s belief that Acadians should not make too much noise in the community. They should listen and not act.
08:28 She and Zach talk about if she would ever live anywhere else
09:24 Zach, Berthe, Jean-Marc Cormier, and Claude Painchaud discuss what it means to be Acadian (family, get togethers, suppers, celebrations)
10:15 Berthe says that she is Acadian first because everything about her lifestyle is different from the rest of Quebec or Canada (the music, food, her accent, the architecture)
11:48 Group discusses that Acadia is like a virtual country in your mind. Although it is not a physical space it comes from the traditions that are passed down
13:14 Zach and Berthe discuss the bright colors of the houses on the island
14:14 Berthe discusses how islanders are taking back ownership of their island and their fishing industry
15:38 She talks about being mayor at the time that the bottom fell out of the fishing industry
16:00 Berthe, Zach, and Frederic discuss erosion on the island and how that causes fish to leave too
18:13 Berthe talks about her childhood on the island
19:06 People begin playing music and starting to cook for a get together
21:16 Zach starts singing and playing guitar
22:46 Rita Bechard sings the Acadian national anthem

Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Video
Collection: 
Acadia North and South Collection
Subject: 
Zach Richard interviewing Berthe Vigneau
Creator: 
Charles Laroque
Recording date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Coverage Spatial: 
Magdalen Island, Quebec
Publisher: 
Louisiane a la carte
Meta Information
Duration: 
26 Minutes
Cataloged Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Digitized Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Original Format: 
CD
Digital Format: 
MP4
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore

Zach Richard interviewing Rene Cormier

Accession No.: 
AC3-016

Episode 16: Acadie, directed by Rene Cormier

00:50 Zach discusses how Acadians have always used music, songs, and poetry to keep their stories alive
02:33 Zach talks about how artistic the Acadians are as a group
03:19 Zach meets performers about to go on stage
03:55 Performers practice back stage
04:09 Rene talks about the confidence that Acadians now have and the voice that keeps the traditions alive
04:57 Rene speaks with the performers about songs they will be performing
07:18 Rene talks about how being Acadian is not just about the deportation history but also about their endurance and how people need to keep that alive
08:50 Zach talks about how everyone has their own story or version of Acadie but people need to come together to keep the stories alive
10:18 Rene talks about a religious event at Sainte-Anne’s that more than just religion. It is also about gathering and community
10:40 Rene’s mother explains that St. Anne is the grandmother to the Acadians
11:17 They discuss where and when the first Acadians to Caraquet came from
13:38 Zach plays piano while Rene plays the accordion
13:59 Rene says that tools like song, music, and other arts are what kept the Acadians alive and what keeps them in the light still today
15:42 Rene explains that “Les Defricheurs d’Eau” is the biggest show that he has ever had to direct
17:06 Shows dress rehearsal
17:38 Rene and actress go over accents so that she sounds more Acadian in the performance
19:00 Rene explains that art is a way to communicate with people
19:51 Rene and Zach talk about how amazing Acadians are for still being around
20:48 Rene talks about the energy before the show

Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Video
Collection: 
Acadia North and South Collection
Subject: 
Zach Richard interviewing Rene Cormier
Creator: 
Charles Laroque
Recording date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Coverage Spatial: 
Caraquet, New Brunswick
Publisher: 
Louisiane a la carte
Meta Information
Duration: 
26 Minutes
Cataloged Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Digitized Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Original Format: 
CD
Digital Format: 
MP4
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore

Zach Richard interviewing Earlene Broussard

Accession No.: 
AC3-017

Episode 17: To Be Learned by Heart... Earlene Broussard

02:10 Zach explains that Earlene Broussard plays the role of Grand’ Mama from the play “C’est p’us pareil” by Richard Guidry.
02:48 Earlene begins acting as Grand’ Mama worried about her child coming home from school crying because she got hit across the face for not speaking English
03:50 Earlene talks to Zach about her childhood and getting told by her mother that English was for use at school while French was for use at home
04:19 Zach and Earlene talk about identity and if one needs to speak French in order to consider themselves Acadian
06:04 Zach talks about the importance of keeping the Cajun French language alive with groups like the one that Earlene created in Gonzales, LA
06:48 Members of the group begin reciting sentences that they created for class
08:21 Earlene explains that if a person cannot read French than it is not really helping the Acadian culture in Louisiana. (Ex. If a grandparent cannot read a French book to their grandchild then that grandchild probably will not learn the language)
09:35 Earlene and others discuss a short play written by Felix Voorhies
10:12 She talks about bringing these small plays to Texas where the audience was amazed and grateful that Cajun French was being used in the play
11:34 Earlene talks to Zach about not getting with what is not happening in Louisiana. She says instead people need to think about what they can do to help
12:38 Zach discusses why Cajun French is dying and what needs to be done in order to fix that
13:38 Earlene teaches her grand daughter how to speak in Cajun French
14:15 She explains that everything should happen within the family
15:14 Earlene talks to students in her class
17:15 She talks about liking whenever the students take the class in order to connect with loved ones
18:00 Zach explains that not everyone can speak French all the time
18:52 Earlene thinks that Louisiana cannot afford to stop speaking French
20:00 Zach talks to Earlene about her painting
21:33 They talk about when she lived in Bouctouche
22:24 Earlene talks about our ancestors being in our hearts not in physical spaces

Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Video
Collection: 
Acadia North and South Collection
Subject: 
Zach Richard interviewing Earlene Broussard
Creator: 
Charles Laroque
Recording date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Coverage Spatial: 
Lafayette, LA
Publisher: 
Louisiane a la carte
Meta Information
Duration: 
26 Minutes
Cataloged Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Digitized Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Original Format: 
CD
Digital Format: 
MP4
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore

Zach Richard interviewing Marc Comeau

Accession No.: 
AC3-018

Episode 18: Marc Cormier - Don't Hurt 'em, M.C.!

00:45 Zach talks about how Acadia is actually bigger than most people think

01:50 Marc Cormier starts singing

02:44 Marc talks about remixing old songs to get the crowd into it

03:02 Zach talks about people using their own inspiration to keep the Acadian tradition going

04:23 Starts singing "Tymer"

04:37 Zach and Marc talk about how so little people speak French anymore because of the influence of North American media

05:47 Marc and band talk about music and performances

06:50 Zach explains that music can have a healing quality

07:24 Marc and Jacques Doucet practice for performance

08:07 Marc tries to define what an Acadian is

09:30 Marc and Jacques in the studio

11:13 Zach talks about passing down traditions and cultures

12:04 Marc and Danny Leblanc discuss how Acadian French is changing and evolving

13:20 Marc and Zach discuss how younger generations think of Acadian culture as a culture of folklore and tradition but it does evolve with the times

14:42 Marc and Jacques rapping

14:58 Marc talks about the 400th anniversary celebration

16:03 Group of Acadians singing taditional song

16:52 Marc talking about how his dad helped him keep his French alive and why it is important

18:08 Paul Comeau and Marc talk about speaking French in school and keeping the tradition alive

18:59 Paul discusses how his wife speaks only English but she can understand French

20:08 Marc and Jacques rapping

20:20 Marc discusses assimilaition and how it will happen fast if people ever stop trying to keep Acadian culture alive

21:25 Zach Richard singing in the studio with Marc and Jacques

22:01 Zach talks about how a culture needs to evolve in order to survive

22:44 Marc rapping in studio

Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Video
Collection: 
Acadia North and South Collection
Subject: 
Zach Richard interviewing Marc Comeau
Creator: 
Charles Laroque
Recording date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Coverage Spatial: 
Comeauville, Nova Scotia
Publisher: 
Louisiane a la carte
Meta Information
Duration: 
26 Minutes
Cataloged Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Digitized Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Original Format: 
CD
Digital Format: 
MP4
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore

Zach Richard interviewing Charlo Guilbeau

Accession No.: 
AC3-019

Episode 19: Charlo Guilbeau - In the Sea of Cajun Love

00:52 Zach explains that Acadians in Louisiana have a hard time because they have to balance between being American and being Acadian

02:23 Zach talks about how so many cultures in Louisiana are mixed together and how it is hard to tell where one ends and the other begins

04:27 Zach and Charlo talk about his past in Carencro

05:27 Charlo and Red Ardoin meet at original Evangeline Downs, they talk about horses and working at the race track

09:21 Zach and Charlo talk about speaking English and French growing up and how it made him feel to not be able to speak French in school

11:24 Charlo singing

11:53 Zach talks about how Acadian culture in Louisiana is going away and that it is surprising that it has lasted this long

12:54 Charlo talks about singing and writing songs

13:13 Charlo talks about his parents when he was growing up

14:11 Charlo and Harry "Big Daddy" Hypolite talk about playing music

15:35 They talk about speaking French and growing up in the country

16:57 Charlo and Harry singing "Lucille"

17:19 Charlo and Zach talk about remixing other songs so that they can be sang in French

18:05 Zach talks about the similarities between the Cajuns and the Acadians and how they are linked by their love of dance. He also describes what a "fais-do-do" is

19:34 Charlo talks about teaching kids French because without French the Cajun way of life will be lost

20:55 Charlo, Charles Mann, and Warren Storm talk about their history with playing music

22:52 Charlo shows his granddaughter where he grew up

23:06 Zach talks about the importance of passing down stories to the young members of the family

Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Video
Collection: 
Acadia North and South Collection
Subject: 
Zach Richard interviewing Charlo Guilbeau
Creator: 
Charles Laroque
Recording date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Coverage Spatial: 
Carencro, LA
Publisher: 
Louisiane a la carte
Meta Information
Duration: 
26 Minutes
Cataloged Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Digitized Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Original Format: 
CD
Digital Format: 
MP4
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore

Zach Richard interviewing Ronald Goguen

Accession No.: 
AC3-020

Episode 20: Ronald Goguen a.k.a. Ronnie Appleseed

00:53 Zach talks about the Acadians needing to live life through their traditions and not just put it down in a story

03:21 Zach talks about Acadians as farmers and keeping up with the seasons

04:35 Ronald talks about his history with apples and orchards

06:16 He tells Zach about Nova Scotia's history with apples

07:31 Ronald discusses people talking badly about farmers because of the poisons and things that they use to keep their crops clean

09:03 Zach talks about how easy Ronald has it , being able to enjoy life

10:20 Zach discusses how much work running a farm is

11:10 Ronald, Zach and Solange Campagne talk about people wanting perfect apples and the new types of pesticides that are used in farming on the day

12:40 Ronald talks about his orchard and how he rathers be with his trees instead of with people sometimes

13:46 Zach explains that Ronald takes a poetic approach to his farming and orchard

14:21 Zach, Ronald, and Solange talk about making the soil better because of how depleted it was before

15:52 Ronald talks about going to college but still coming back to farming. He also talks about people coming to the farm and thinking it smelf bad and other things

17:19 Zach talks about his history with Ronald, about how his photography is good but suffers because of his life on the farm

18:05 Ronald shows Zach some of his artworks and explains how he gets certain look on certain peices

21:48 Zach and Ronald talk about the difference between a gumbo and a fricot

Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Video
Collection: 
Acadia North and South Collection
Subject: 
Zach Richard interviewing Ronald Goguen
Creator: 
Charles Laroque
Recording date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Coverage Spatial: 
Cocagne, New Brunswick
Publisher: 
Louisiane a la carte
Meta Information
Duration: 
26 Minutes
Cataloged Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Digitized Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Original Format: 
CD
Digital Format: 
MP4
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore

Zach Richard interviewing Clara Baudoin

Accession No.: 
AC3-021

Episode 21: Clara Baudoin - Lache Pas la Patate

00:48 Zach explains the Cajun culture is one thought to be of ignorance and poverty, people like Clara Baudoin are battling that image in the political arena

02:19 Zach explains that with the bad there is some good in politics in Louisiana

03:21 Clara talks about getting into politics

04:48 Clara speaks with group of men about environmental issues in the area, she talks about having to rent a helicopter and video wrong doings by oil companies in order to get them to stop

08:07 Zach explains that being a poilitican is like being a farmer

08:50 Clara speaks with Mavis Fruge and her grandson, Sam, about learning French and growing up not being able to speak it at school

09:58 Mavis lists out words that are different in Cajun French than in proper French

10:31 Clara explains that not one language is better than another, she talks about going to do to to campaign and meeting more French speakers than she thought she would

11:34 Shows a crawfish boil for Chris John, Congressman for the district in Southwest Louisiana

12:04 Lynn Breaux and John Broussard talk about Chris John helping out farmers who only speak French and having to be bilingual in order to conduct business in the area

12:46 Zach explains that before the 18th century many Acadians did not like American politics but they put their own spin on it with having crawfish boils and other cookouts

13:14 Clara and her husband Joe discuss their fruit trees

14:02 Clara doesn't think that she could be in politics without her husband helping out at home

15:13 She talks about what her parents would think about her being in politics

15:37 Joe talks about helping Clara in her campaign and being happy that she had won

16:54 Zach asks if Clara thinks that the Cajun culture will be lost if Cajun French is lost

17:43 Zach talks about what characteristics are Cajun

19:18 Dinner group talks about French immersion and how well the students do

19:44 Lady in dinner group talks about not knowing English before she started school

20:11 Clara describes a bill failing in congress to protect Motorcycle riders

21:04 Clara speaks in front of the state House of Representatives, thanking them for making the third week of September "Acadian Heritage Week"

22:15 Zach and Clara discuss how good the week is for the culture but that they cannot stop there

Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Video
Collection: 
Acadia North and South Collection
Subject: 
Zach Richard interviewing Clara Baudoin
Creator: 
Charles Laroque
Recording date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Coverage Spatial: 
Baton Rouge, LA
Publisher: 
Louisiane a la carte
Meta Information
Duration: 
26 Minutes
Cataloged Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Digitized Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Original Format: 
CD
Digital Format: 
MP4
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore

Zach Richard interviewing Eileen Chiasson-Pendergast

Accession No.: 
AC3-022

Episode 22: Eileen Chiasson-Pendergast - My Name is Acadie

00:50 Zach talks about Acadian assimilation and how there are people that fight it

02:14 Zach compares Prince Edward Island to Louisiana because both are at risk of losing their Acadian culture

03:01 Eileen discusses putting on different community events so that the Acadian community can love who they are and where they came from

04:12 Eileen and other members of the French Choir talk about how much they enjoy keeping the Acadian culture and community alive

05:29 Eileen talks about pushing the members hard but that it benefits the community

06:38 She talks about what bothers her with the Acadian culture and how they are portrayed

08:11 Eileen in her classroom speaking to the students in French

08:28 Zach talks about the three legs of Acadian culture: Church, School, Family

09:08 Eileen talks about opening a French school

11:13 She directs community actors in a performance in the church

11:57 She talks about her life and growing up being Acadian

12:45 Community actors perform in church

13:14 Eileen describes herself and her determination in speaking French

14:50 She talks about throwing herself into so many different opportunities to show others that she was determined

15:21 Group singing and playing music

15:38 Zach talks about having love, food, and music in a home

16:11 Zach and Eileen talk about different Acadian names in her family tree

16:44 She talks about how she is Acadian and what she does to add to the Acadian culture

18:08 Zach and Eileen talk about the decline of French in Louisiana and if it is different from Prince Edward Island

19:25 Eileen talks about her childhood and how it led her to helping the Acadian Cause

22:19 Eileen and others singing and playing music

Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Video
Collection: 
Acadia North and South Collection
Subject: 
Zach Richard interviewing Eileen Chiasson-Pendergast
Creator: 
Charles Laroque
Recording date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Coverage Spatial: 
Tignish, Prince Edward Island
Publisher: 
Louisiane a la carte
Meta Information
Duration: 
26 Minutes
Cataloged Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Digitized Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Original Format: 
CD
Digital Format: 
MP4
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore

Zach Richard interviewing Cecile Maillet

Accession No.: 
AC3-023

Episode 23: The Citadel of Cecile Maillet

00:55 Zach Richard explains how one feels Acadian

02:29 Zach talks about how the Acadians in Quebec seemed to have blended in very well and how that now makes it hard to see the difference between people with and without Acadian culture

03:35 Cecile explains that she takes her Acadie with her wherever she goes because it is inside of her no matter what

04:34 Cecile and Zach discuss how long she has been in Quebec

05:23 Zach talks about what it means to be Acadian in a place that does not often show Acadian culture within its day to day life

06:07 Laval Doucet talks about Acadie being in ones soul not in the place that they live

07:00 Laval and Zach discuss what being an Acadian means

08:05 Cecile talks about meeting Laval for the first time

09:00 She talks about having the taste for life and breathing in all it has to offer

10:21 Cecile and Zach stand on the fort by the river where the English attacked Quebec and talk about history

11:10 Zach and Cecile talk about Longfellow and how his story helped keep the Acadian traditions alive

11:24 "Evangeline" interpreted by Marie-Jo Therio

12:12 Cecile and Zach talk about suffering and changing as time goes on

13:13 Zach trys to define what Acadians are if they are outside of Acadie

14:10 Zach and guy talk about the Battle of the Plains of Abraham and how there are many different histories that belong to one area

16:26 Cecile and Edith Butler talks about Acadian music

18:58 Zach talks about how politics is one way to distinguish Acadian from Quebec

19:17 Zach and Monique Gagnon-Tremblay talk about Quebec's role in spreading French throughout North America

20:26 Zach and Jacques Saada talk about bringing Canadians together through language

21:53 Zach brings together a mixture of Acadians and Quebekers to enjoy music and food

Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Video
Collection: 
Acadia North and South Collection
Subject: 
Zach Richard interviewing Cecile Maillet
Creator: 
Charles Laroque
Recording date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Coverage Spatial: 
Quebec City, Quebec
Publisher: 
Louisiane a la carte
Meta Information
Duration: 
26 Minutes
Cataloged Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Digitized Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Original Format: 
CD
Digital Format: 
MP4
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore

Zach Richard interviewing Carolyne Jomphe

Accession No.: 
AC3-024

Episode 24: Simply - Carolyne Jomphe

00:47 Zach talks about how the deportation of Acadians was meant to get rid of this group of people but instead it made the culture spread

02:10 Carolyne onstage getting and award, then starts singing

04:14 Carolyne talks about where her last name came from and her history with being an Acadian

05:44 Carolyne singing

06:49 She talks about her history with music and her memories of her mother singing to her when she was younger

08:05 She prepares for video shoot

09:17 Carolyne talks about her career and how it took some time for her to be able to work in Quebec

10:20 She works on filming her music video

11:14 Zach talks about how Acadians can be multiple things but in the world of branding that can be hard

12:28 Zach and Carolyne talk about why she identifies as Acadian

14:01 Carolyne sings

16:29 She describes what being Acadian means to her

17:35 Zach talks about Acadians and what they use in order to consider themselves Acadian

18:30 Carolyn talks about where she's from and how that influences her

21:29 She talks about her life now

Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Video
Collection: 
Acadia North and South Collection
Subject: 
Zach Ricahrd interviewing Carolyne Jomphe
Creator: 
Charles Laroque
Recording date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Coverage Spatial: 
Quebec City, Quebec
Publisher: 
Louisiane a la carte
Meta Information
Duration: 
26 Minutes
Cataloged Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Digitized Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Original Format: 
CD
Digital Format: 
MP4
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore

Zach Richard interviewing Rosemonde Cormier

Accession No.: 
AC3-025

Episode 25: Rosemonde Cormier's Other Acadian Odyssey

00:53 Zach talks about Acadians that were forced out always wanting to come back and reunite with their families

03:23 Rosemonde talks about leaving Acadia to live in France

05:32 She talks about keeping the memories of childhood alive within oneself and how those can never be taken away

06:33 Rosemonde and friends talk about where they want to die, get married, and other life events

08:50 Rosemonde discusses the hard parts of being away from Canada and her family there

09:23 Zach asks if her connection with Acadie is nostalgic or not?

10:27 Zach and Rosemonde discuss Acadian history

11:00 They go to the archives where Rosemonde spends her days learning about the history of Nantes, France, here they discuss the history of people who traveled from France to Acadie

12:18 Zach discusses people traveling from France to Louisiana in the 1780s

15:32 Rosemonde discusses having a happy life

16:35 Rosemonde and friends discuss the differences in words and cultures between France and Acadie

18:21 Jeu-Dit Theater Company rehearsal of "The Sister-in-Law" by Michel Tremblay

21:53 Rosemonde's friends play "Happy Birthday" for her on instruments

22:09 Aurele Salmon sings to Rosemonde

Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Video
Collection: 
Acadia North and South Collection
Subject: 
Zach Richard interviewing Rosemonde Cormier
Creator: 
Charles Laroque
Recording date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Coverage Spatial: 
Nantes, France
Publisher: 
Louisiane a la carte
Meta Information
Duration: 
26 Minutes
Cataloged Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Digitized Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Original Format: 
CD
Digital Format: 
MP4
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore

Zach Richard interviewing Maryvonne LeGac

Accession No.: 
AC3-026

Episode 26: Maryvonne Legac's - Beautiful Rock of Refuge

00:56 Zach explains the traveling of some Acadian families after deportation

04:46 Maryvonne talks about how she collects rocks and shells from wherever she goes including Acadie

05:22 She talks about her mother and her love for Acadie

05:53 Zach and Maryvonne discuss how being educated helped keep the Acadian memories alive

06:22 Maryvonne talks about being a member of the community on Belle-Ile and how as a community member you have to welcome in Acadians from all over who are trying to find their roots

07:45 Maryvonne shares some local folk lore with Zach

08:26 Zach and Maryvonne talk about the connection between Louisiana and Belle-Ile and between the Acadians everywhere

09:55 Zach talks about making a pilgrimage to Belle-Ile to learn about and feel the spirit of his ancestors

10:31 Zach and Maryvonne talk about Pierre Richard and how Acadians survived on the island during the 1700s

13:38 At the village of Kervarigeon, they discuss the history of the Acadians and meet with the descendants of one of the Acadian families from the area

14:59 Zach talks about genealogy, how it's not just for one certain type of person, and how it brings people together

15:43 Marie-Claire Granger teaches Zach the "Tra-la-la de l'ile"

17:38 band playing for group dancing

17:53 Zach talks about Acadians and their love of dancing

18:48 Zach explains his connection with Belle-Ile to the crowd, then he sings for them

19:58 Zach and Maryvonne talk about a sense of belonging that belongs to the Acadians even though Acadie is more of a fictional place now

21:21 Zach Richard singing

Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Video
Collection: 
Acadia North and South Collection
Subject: 
Zach Richard interviewing Maryvonne LeGac
Creator: 
Charles Laroque
Recording date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Coverage Spatial: 
Belle-Ile-en Mer, France
Publisher: 
Louisiane a la carte
Meta Information
Duration: 
26 Minutes
Cataloged Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Digitized Date: 
Monday, July 2, 2018
Original Format: 
CD
Digital Format: 
MP4
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore

Musical Performance by Lionel Leleux, Varise Connor, and Eric and Edgar Benoit

Accession No.: 
AN1-001

***Copy of AN1-086 and AN1-240?***

Lionel Leleux:
0:00 - La Valse de Holly Beach
Waltz de Bascom Mouton (La malheureuse)
5:00 - Honey in the Rock
Grand Night Special

Varise Connor:
11:10 - Untitled Waltz in G
If You Don't See Your Mama Every Night;
17:20 - Grand Mamou in D
19:50 - Grand Basile
Down South;
24:29 - Air (St. Louis Blues?)

Varise Connor (violin), Lionel Leleux (violin), Eric & Edgar Benoit (guitar)

Language: 
English
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Ancelet
Subject: 
Louisiana; Cajuns; Folk Music; Violins; Fiddle
Creator: 
Barry Jean Ancelet
Informants: 
Lionel Leleux, Varise Connor, and Eric and Edgar Benoit
Recording date: 
Thursday, April 7, 1977
Coverage Spatial: 
Lake Arthur, LA
Publisher: 
Center for Louisiana Studies
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
25:54
Cataloged Date: 
Tuesday, March 21, 2006
Digitized Date: 
Tuesday, March 21, 2006
Original Format: 
Audio--Reel--5"
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore - Cabinet 1 Shelf 2

Interview with and musical performance by Varise Connor, Lionel Leleux and Michael Doucet

Accession No.: 
AN1-002

Varise Connor (Violin), Lionel Leleux (Violin), Michael Doucet (Violin), Eric & Edgar Benoit (Guitars)

0:00 - J'ai été au bal in D;
1:47 - Reno Waltz
J'ai passé devant ta porte;
7:42 - Grand Mamou
Grand Basile;
11:34 - J.B. Fuselier played accordion and fiddle. Moved to Lake Arthur to play with Varise and Murphy (Varise's youngest brother) for about 3 years.
Death of Iry LeJeune. Varise never played with Iry. He played with J.B. on accordion and brother Murphy on guitar;
Weren't guaranteed pay, maybe would get 50% of door during the Depression. Varise got tired of it and quit playing around 1930s. Crowd would come, but they didn't have the money to get in. Then J.B. left to play with Iry after that;
J.B. Fuselier reunion after 40 years. Andy was in the hospital and Varise decide to look him up in the phone book, call him and go visit him. He was standing outside at the road waiting for Varise and they hugged. He didn't play anymore and showed Varise his garden. He then told Varise he had an accordion and a fiddle inside. J.B. was never ashamed to be on the bandstand with Varise;
14:48 - String Band music. Oldest brother played bass("bull fiddle"), youngest brother played guitar, Varise played fiddle, first cousin played second fiddle(no harmonies, just behind)
Joe Falcon's first record. Everybody wanted to play accordion after that. Changed some of the music, wasn't the old fiddle music like before;
Limitations of the accordion. 10 keys/actually 20 notes.Everything sounds almost alike after 2 or 3 tunes. Like a banjo. So many more chords on violin, C, D, G, A chords makes all the difference;
Varise does like a good accordion player like Nathan Abshire. Nathan was raised in Riceville, Varise doesn't recall playing with him;
Amédé Breaux's brother and sister. Ophé and Cleoma Breaux. He wanted Varise to come take his place so he could go dance with a pretty woman;
18:40 - Varise Connor's aunt changed religion and didn't believe in music. They hadn't seen her in years, and one day she came home and said that it was a shame that Varise, his brother, and his father didn't play church hymns. What they played was a sin because it's a dance music. What goes on in a man's mind when he's holding a pretty girl in his arms. Made his father laugh
Might be a sin, but Varise won't ever change his style of playing;
Difference between string band and accordion music. Grand Mamou and Grand Basile for the accordion. Diesel?;
Fiddle tunes:
"Chère joues roses"
"Chère bassette" (starts on turn);
J.B. had 2 wives and named a song after each one, "Chère bassette" and "Chère bouclette"

Language: 
English
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Ancelet
Subject: 
Louisiana; Cajun, Folk music; Violin; Fiddle; French
Creator: 
Barry Jean Ancelet
Informants: 
Varise Connor, Lionel Leleux and Michael Doucet
Recording date: 
Thursday, May 26, 1977
Coverage Spatial: 
Lake Arthur, LA
Publisher: 
Center for Louisiana Studies
Rights Usage: 
All Rights reseved
Meta Information
Duration: 
23:55
Cataloged Date: 
Wednesday, May 31, 2017
Digitized Date: 
Thursday, May 1, 2014
Original Format: 
Audio--Reel--5"
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore - Cabinet 1 Shelf 2

Interview with and musical performance by Lionel Leleux, Varise Connor, Michael Doucet and Eric and Edgar Benoit

Accession No.: 
AN1-003

Lionel Leleux (Violin), Varise Connor (Violin), Michael Doucet (Violin), Edgar Benoit (Guitar)

0:00 - Lake Arthur Stomp;
1:58 - Petite flamme bleue (frag.)
Petite flamme bleue;
4:22 - Over the Seas
8:48 - Recording stories. Violin he(Barry?) bought with John Henry and wanted him to teach him. The guy had dark hair and glasses, the guy was Lionel. Taking pictures;
Flammes d'enfer (frag.). Lionel will sing Hathway Two Step (joking)
Flammes d'enfer;
13:03 - La dernière valse with vocals
Hathaway Two-Step;
21:08 - Varise tells Lionel to get closer to him. Untitled Bascom Mouton Waltz

Language: 
English
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Ancelet
Subject: 
Louisiana; Cajuns, Folk music; violin; fiddle
Creator: 
Barry Jean Ancelet
Informants: 
Lionel Leleux, Varise Connor, Michael Doucet and Eric and Edgar Benoit
Recording date: 
Tuesday, October 25, 1977
Coverage Spatial: 
Lake Arthur, LA
Publisher: 
Center for Louisiana Studies
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
23:36
Cataloged Date: 
Thursday, June 1, 2017
Digitized Date: 
Thursday, May 1, 2014
Original Format: 
Audio--Reel--5"
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore - Cabinet 1 Shelf 2

Musical Performance by Varise Connor, Lionel Leleux, Eric Benoit and Edgar Benoit

Accession No.: 
AN1-004

Varise Connor (violin), Lionel Leleux (Violin), Eric & Edgar Benoit (guitars)

0:00 - Carroll County Blues (St. Louis Blues?);
3:38 - Lionel knows enough to where he knows he doesn't know everything. Some people know just enough to think they know everything;
Honey in the Rock?
5:57 - La valse de Grand Bois
"If you can dance a pretty waltz with a woman, she will never refuse to marry you"- Varise Connor's father;
Story about Bascom Mouton preparing for a dance/rosining his bow. "People, I didn't come here to cause y'all pain." - Bascom Mouton;
10:16 - The Rabbit Stole the Pumpkin
Bascom Mouton tuned his fiddle so high, Varise thought it would explode. His voice was high enough to sing with it;
J'ai été au bal;
La vieille malheureuse in D;
It Ain't Gonna Rain No More;
Sabine Blues;
Dis bye-bye à ta mame (Mon cher bébé créole);
Perrodin Two Step;
Untitled Two Step;

Language: 
English
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Ancelet
Subject: 
Louisiana; Cajun; Folk music; violin; fiddle
Creator: 
Barry Jean Ancelet
Informants: 
Varise Connor, Lionel Leleux, Eric Benoit and Edgar Benoit
Recording date: 
Thursday, April 7, 1977
Coverage Spatial: 
Lake Arthur, LA
Publisher: 
Center for Louisiana Studies
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
24:33
Cataloged Date: 
Thursday, June 1, 2017
Digitized Date: 
Thursday, May 1, 2014
Original Format: 
Audio--Reel--5"
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore - Cabinet 1 Shelf 2

Interview with and musical performance by Varise Connor, Eric Benoit, and Michael Doucet

Accession No.: 
AN1-005

Varise Connor (Violin), Eric Benoit (Guitar), Michael Doucet (Violin)

0:00 - Story of visit with Bascom Mouton and tuning high. Ulysse Fontenot was the best rhythm man Varise ever had. Creole Waltz. 7th fret in B. Lionel wrote to his son in the army and said there's something he's never heard before. Just figured out lately how it was tuned. Easier to tune guitar up (2nd fret);
American Two-Step;
Sawmill Two-Step. Varise never names tunes, just makes up tunes;
5:30 - Lionel's visit with Varise and drinking whiskey out of tea cups so ladies wouldn't know. Lionel left with Barry, but left his keys and everything at Varise's. By the time he got back to Lake Arthur, it was almost daylight. Lionel wouldn't find his way back until he had another drink
Old Cajun Waltz;
9:20 - Old guitar Eric played when he was younger. Back of guitar had different colors of wood. hummingbirds, butterflies, flowers. From Mrs. Henry Rupert. Andy learned on that guitar. Schexnyder from Crowley makes arch top guitars/fiddles. He makes everything except the strings and pegs. Like LeLeux making fiddles
11:48 - Kentucky in G
La valse du soûlard;
16:43 - Westphalia Waltz
Last dance was just as energetic/lively as the first one. Didn't have to drink to be like that. Very likable fellow. He might not have won contests, but Varise liked his style. Cajun and Spanish music in more lively than any other music. But Cajuns break rules by playing one tune, then taking parts of other tunes to make a new one;
Bascom's wife backed him up on guitar, "but she only knew one note" according to Varise. He would dance in his chair and would break factory chairs. Only homemade chairs could handle him;
22:26 - Bascom told Lionel about the first time he saw Varise. There's a Connor in Lake Arthur who plays real well, but not very loud. Big fingers on guitar look like hammer-head. Ulysse Fontenot as rhythm man
23:17 - Bascom Mouton tune - The Rabbit Stole the Pumpkin
25:25 - Bascom Mouton would sing. Use of kazoo in his songs. Tuning fiddle so high and singing so high. Excited.
You'd Better See Your Mama Every Night (like Bascom in D/Varise plays it in G);

Language: 
English
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Ancelet
Subject: 
Louisiana; Cajun; Folk music; violin; fiddle
Creator: 
Barry Jean Ancelet
Informants: 
Varise Connor, Eric Benoit, and Michael Doucet
Recording date: 
Thursday, May 26, 1977
Coverage Spatial: 
Lake Arthur, LA
Publisher: 
Center for Louisiana Studies
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
28:59
Cataloged Date: 
Thursday, June 1, 2017
Digitized Date: 
Thursday, January 15, 2015
Original Format: 
Audio--Reel--5"
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore - Cabinet 1 Shelf 2

Musical performance by Michael Doucet, Varise Connor, Lionel Leleux and Edgar Benoit

Accession No.: 
AN1-006

Michael Doucet (violin), Varise Connor (violin), Lionel Leleux (violin), Edgar Benoit (guitar);

0:00 - Michael Doucet: La valse des Cherokees;
Lionel Leleux: Lacassine Special (fragment);
Lacassine Special (reprise);
5:58 - Michael Doucet: Dans la misère
Chère bouclette;
Chère bassette;
8:29 - Chère bassette in D (fragment)
La valse de Grand Bois (Doc Guidry's version) (fragment with Varise Connor). the same as "Jolie blonde," "Jolie brune," and "La fille de la veuve" according to Lionel;
12:36 - La vielle valse à Bascom Mouton (La malchanseuse)
La valse de Grand Bois (with Lionel Leleux);
Valse sans titre in D;
17:37 - Westphalia Waltz in G
20:37 - La valse des rangers in F, Varise prefers it in C
Beautiful Bunch of Daisies;

Language: 
English
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Ancelet
Subject: 
Louisiana; Cajuns; Folk music; violin; fiddle
Creator: 
Barry Jean Ancelet
Informants: 
Michael Doucet, Varise Connor, Lionel Leleux and Edgar Benoit
Recording date: 
Tuesday, October 25, 1977
Coverage Spatial: 
Lake Arthur, LA
Publisher: 
Center for Louisiana Studies
Rights Usage: 
All rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
24.49
Cataloged Date: 
Thursday, June 1, 2017
Digitized Date: 
Tuesday, January 1, 2002
Original Format: 
Audio--Reel--5"
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore - Cabinet 1 Shelf 2

Musical performance by Varise Connor, Lionel Leleux, Edgar Benoit and Eric Benoit

Accession No.: 
AN1-007

Varise Connor (Violin), Lionel Leleux (Violin), Edgar or Eric Benoit (Guitar)

0:00 - Lake Arthur Stomp (4 parts); Lake Arthur Stomp (Variation);
3:21 - change of tuning; Lake Arthur Stomp (variation); Swing/Blues;
6:34 - La valse à deux temps (Untitled); La valse à défunt Andy;
10:13 - Untitled Two-Step (M & S Special?); Le rêve du diable;
12:27 - Fi Fi Poncho; Jolie blonde;
15:04 - Chère toute toute; Valse à Bascom;
19:10 - Lake Arthur Stomp (Variation with two violins) (19:10); La dernière valse (two violins);
23:17 - Valse à Bascom (two violins)

Language: 
English
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Ancelet
Subject: 
Louisiana; Cajuns; Folk music; violin; fiddle
Creator: 
Barry Jean Ancelet
Informants: 
Varise Connor, Lionel Leleux, Edgar Benoit and Eric Benoit
Recording date: 
Thursday, April 7, 1977
Coverage Spatial: 
Lake Arthur, LA
Publisher: 
Center for Louisiana Studies
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
24:37
Cataloged Date: 
Thursday, June 1, 2017
Digitized Date: 
Thursday, January 15, 2015
Original Format: 
Audio--Reel--5"
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore - Cabinet 1 Shelf 2

Musical performance by Michael Doucet, Varise Connor, Lionel Leleux and Edgar Benoit

Accession No.: 
AN1-008

Varise Connor (violin), Lionel Leleux (violin), Michael Doucet (violin), Edgar Benoit (guitar)

0:00 - Lionel's son was at a camp in Columbia, South Carolina. Violin wood cut Oct. 1957; 1923/24/25, Lionel listening to Bascom from outside the dancehall;
Bascom Mouton dances at Red Hall in 1924/25. Had to invite girl to dance and if you danced too close, her mother would come and separate you;
Bascom was preparing to play dance/rosining up his bow and the people were watching him, so he told them, "people, I didn't come to cause you pain/misery"; violin without varnish;
3:59 - making violins; one-piece back. 70 piece in a violin including pegs, strings, lining & purfling; 20 pieces in each two-piece back/top,18 without block, 6 blocks, head, 4 pegs, 4 strings, fingerboard, nut, tailpiece, end pin, tail gut, etc.; Perrodin Two-Step (frag.)
6:59 - La valse de Reno ; La valse de Reno (variation with vocals);
11:56 - Down South; If You Don't See Your Mama Every Night in G;
17:22 - Bascom Mouton's style; Sabine Blues in D;
20:33 - Chère toute toute

***Only month and year were included in original notes, no specific day

Language: 
English
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Ancelet
Subject: 
Louisiana; Cajun; Folk music; violin; fiddle
Creator: 
Barry Jean Ancelet
Informants: 
Michael Doucet, Varise Connor, Lionel Leleux and Edgar Benoit
Recording date: 
Saturday, October 1, 1977
Coverage Spatial: 
Lake Arthur, LA
Publisher: 
Center for Louisiana Studies
Rights Usage: 
All rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
23.27
Cataloged Date: 
Thursday, June 1, 2017
Digitized Date: 
Tuesday, January 1, 2002
Original Format: 
Audio--Reel--5"
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore - Cabinet 1 Shelf 2

Musical performance by Varise Connor, Lionel Leleux and Don Montoucet

Accession No.: 
AN1-009

Varise Connor (Violin), Lionel Leleux (Violin), Don Montoucet (accordion) Barry Ancelet (Guitar)?;

0:00 - Hathaway Two-Step; talking, offering beer and coffee; Lionel telling Barry when to come in on Chère Alice. Lionel and Don choreographing/discussing the order of the song(turning it vs. playing it like Lawrence Walker).
6:27 - Chère Alice; Practicing Chère Alice;
11:24 - Jeunes filles de la campagne. Singing first (in wrong "gear"/key)
12:28 - Accordion starts; Jolie catin/Eunice Two-Step;
19:57 - La dernière valse (frag.); Eunice Two Step (reprise)
23:36 - Love Bridge Waltz (Eunice Two Step as a waltz)
27:51 - Dans les misères (Lacassine Special as a waltz)
30:28 - Lacassine Special

***Only month and year were included in original notes, no specific day

Language: 
English
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Ancelet
Subject: 
Louisiana; Cajuns; Folk music; violin; fiddle; accordion
Creator: 
Barry Jean Ancelet
Informants: 
Varise Connor, Lionel Leleux and Don Montoucet
Recording date: 
Saturday, October 1, 1977
Coverage Spatial: 
Lake Arthur, LA
Publisher: 
Center for Louisiana Studies
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
32:16
Cataloged Date: 
Thursday, June 1, 2017
Digitized Date: 
Monday, August 31, 2015
Original Format: 
Audio--Reel--5"
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore - Cabinet 1 Shelf 2

Musical performance by Varise Connor, Lionel Leleux, Don Montoucet, and Eric Benoit

Accession No.: 
AN1-010

Varise Connor (Violin), Lionel Leleux (Violin), Don Montoucet (accordion) Eric Benoit (Guitar);

Varise:
0:00 - Chère bouclette (J.B. Fuselier's version, almost like Chère bassette);
3:18 - Mazurka des Aguillards; tuning fiddle
7:22 - Varise can play Sugar Foot Rag/Black Mountain Rag/Devil's Dream (Contredanse/Square Dance); Varise is having trouble playing how he wants; Lake Arthur Stomp;
10:29 - Maiden's Prayer/La prière de la vieille fille; Kentucky;
14:56 - Hobson; St. Louis Blues?

Lionel and Don:
17:49 - Jolie blonde. Barry jokes she'll be a "Jolie grise" when she gets old/gray hair
22:22 - J'ai été au bal; Guests from Washington D.C. speak a little French; J'ai été au bal - reprise with voice (Barry Ancelet;
28:34 - Varise compliments everyone (Barry sang well, Leleux can't help but be good, and Don made no mistakes)
29:40 - Je peux pas t'oublier

***Only month and year were included in original notes, no specific day

Language: 
English
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Ancelet
Subject: 
Louisiana;Cajun; Folk music; violin; fiddle; accordion
Creator: 
Barry Jean Ancelet and Frank Proschan
Informants: 
Varise Connor, Lionel Leleux, Don Montoucet, and Eric Benoit
Recording date: 
Saturday, October 1, 1977
Coverage Spatial: 
Lake Arthur, LA
Publisher: 
Center for Louisiana Studies
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
32:36
Cataloged Date: 
Thursday, June 1, 2017
Digitized Date: 
Monday, August 31, 2015
Original Format: 
Audio--Reel--5"
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore - Cabinet 1 Shelf 2

Interview with and musical performance by Varise Connor, Lionel Leleux, and Don Montoucet

Accession No.: 
AN1-011

Varise Connor (violin), Lionel Leleux (violin), Don Montoucet (accordion);

0:00 - La valse du soûlard; getting Varise a couple of drinks; Westphalia Waltz; talking/taking photos;
6:29 - Down South. Learned it from Hubert Fontenot on fiddle about 4 years ago. Heard others play it. Not old, not new either. Heard jazz bands play that same melody; tuning guitar
10:38 - Grand Basile in D; Perrodin Two-Step (learned it from one of his uncles who played accordion; Hayes);
16:53 - The Rabbit Stole the Pumpkin (Two-Step à Bascom Mouton). "It takes a lot of steam to fire up a rusty boiler." - Varise; Varise not content with the way he's playing; Varise knew Bascom Mouton in his prime, 1924/25;
19:48 - J'ai été au bal. "That's one Leleux can really play well" - Varise; Bascom played songs like "The Rabbit Stole the Pumpkin," "Sabine Blues," and "You'd Better See Your Mama Every Night." He had the highest voice of anyone Varise had ever heard; noodling around with "In The Mood";
23:08 - Sabine Blues; Bascom played that song, but so did Jazz bands. He didn't have much of a band, just one guitar and two fiddles. His guitar player was his brother-in-law for sure, maybe the other fiddler was his wife's cousin. Both were Thibodeauxs. Bascom also played the kazoo and make it sound like a trumpet;
26:53 - You'd Better See Your Mama Every Night in D
27:15 - in G; not supposed to be played very fast, like blues. Sung in English. "You don't see your mama every night, treat her right, you won't have no mama at all."; Varise played this song with his brothers, "they could rock and roll on that."
30:54 - St. Louis Blues

***Only month and year were included in original notes, no specific day

Language: 
English
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Ancelet
Subject: 
Louisiana; Cajuns; Folkmusic; violin; fiddle
Creator: 
Barry Jean Ancelet and Frank Proschan
Informants: 
Varise Connor, Lionel Leleux, and Don Montoucet
Recording date: 
Saturday, October 1, 1977
Coverage Spatial: 
Lake Arthur, LA
Publisher: 
Center for Louisiana Studies
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
32:04
Cataloged Date: 
Thursday, June 1, 2017
Digitized Date: 
Monday, August 31, 2015
Original Format: 
Audio--Reel--5"
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore - Cabinet 1 Shelf 2

Musical performance by Varise Connor

Accession No.: 
AN1-012

0:00 - St. Louis Blues. Used to play with his brothers in 1930s; Carroll County Blues. Almost identical to St. Louis Blues; Blues has been a part of Cajun music for a while;
3:14 - Lake Arthur Stompl; Lake Arthur Stomp (reprise). He heard it before, but not like this. Varise worked on it until he got it to where it is now;
7:45 - Lake Arthur Two-Step; switching fiddles. rocking the bow; Varise asks if they'd want the "Sugar Foot Rag"
10:48 - Chère toute toute; Jolie blonde in A (Don wanted to hear that);
14:54 - La valse à Moreau; Fi Fi Poncho;
18:31 - Mon cher bébé créole/La valse de samedi soir. At first, Varise thought it was called "Madame Young." Reprise sung by Barry Ancelet. Varise offers to play it in G instead of in D so it'll be easier for Barry to sing; Barry asks Varise if he knows "Jurez my Lord/Demain c'est pas dimanche (Adieu Rosa)" or "La valse des piniers"
26:21 - Creole Waltz; T'es petite et t'es mignonne

***Only month and year were included in original notes, no specific day

Language: 
English
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Ancelet
Subject: 
Louisiana; Cajun; Folk music; violin; fiddle
Creator: 
Barry Ancelet and Frank Proschan
Informants: 
Varise Connor
Recording date: 
Saturday, October 1, 1977
Coverage Spatial: 
Lake Arthur, LA
Publisher: 
Center for Louisiana Studies
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
30:39
Cataloged Date: 
Friday, June 2, 2017
Digitized Date: 
Tuesday, January 1, 2002
Original Format: 
Audio--Reel--5"
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore - Cabinet 1 Shelf 2

Musical Performance by Les Frères Balfa/Lionel Leleux, Don Montoucet and the Wandering Aces

Accession No.: 
AN1-013

Lionel Leleux; Don Montoucet; Wandering Aces; Sammy Boudreaux; Virgil Montoucet; Terry Montoucet; Hubert Maitre; Les Frères Balfa (Dewey and Rodney Balfa, Dick Richard, Nonc Allie Young, & Ray Abshire)

0:00 - Cypress Inn Two-Step;
4:17 - J'ai un cœur cassé (La Valse de Chagrin); J'ai été au bal;
11:33 - J'ai été au bal reprise; Ttalking on the bandstand; Dewey's happy to be here, tells the crowd they're from Acadia and Evangeline parishes. Lawrence Walker from Rayne? left good memories and beautiful songs.
15:05 - Petits yeux noirs
19:09 - J'ai vu le loup, le renard et la belette. Learned while they were in France; Barry asking for lights and introduction to last song. You had some, you ain't gonna get no more of this group (talking to crowd). Dewey and Rodney Balfa, Dick Richard, Nonc Allie Young, & Ray Abshire. The Wandering Aces are coming up next and will probaly go past midnight. Bois Sec (Ardoin) is on his way, he's wet so he has to dry off first (joke). Groups from Québec, Belgium, France, and New Orleans want to film dancers;
24:55 - T'en as eu, t'en auras plus
29:12 - T'en as eu, t'en auras plus (reprise)

Wandering Aces (Lionel Leleux (violin) and Don Montoucet (accordion), with Sammy Boudreaux (drums), Virgil & Terry Montoucet (accordion & rhythm guitar respectively), & Hubert Maitre (rhythm guitar):

31:50 - Chère toute-toute
36:55 - Hathaway Two-Step. Hubert sends it out to Tony who works fro the highway and his good buddy whose name he doesn't remember, Horace Guidry?, and for everyone there tonight
42:12 - Midnight Waltz for all the French people here tonight
46:55 - Les flammes d'enfer with Sammy on vocals

***Only year was included in original notes, no specific month or day

Language: 
English
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Ancelet
Subject: 
Louisiana; Cajuns; Folk music; accordion; violin; fiddle
Creator: 
Barry Jean Ancelet
Informants: 
Les Frères Balfas/Lionel Leleux, Don Montoucet and the Wandering Aces
Recording date: 
Saturday, January 1, 1977
Coverage Spatial: 
Lafayette, LA (Thomas Park)
Publisher: 
Center for Louisiana Studies
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
48:50
Cataloged Date: 
Friday, June 2, 2017
Digitized Date: 
Tuesday, January 1, 2002
Original Format: 
Audio--Reel--7"
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore - Cabinet 1 Shelf 2

Musical Performance by the Balfa Brothers with Allie Young and Dick Richard

Accession No.: 
AN1-014

0:00 - Barry welcomes crowd to festival; Hicks Wagon Wheel Special;
2:24 - Waltz of No Return
6:15 - Pleure pas mes chers petits yeux bleus
8:34 - Hack à Moreau?
11:39 - Intro to "Jolie blonde" by A.J.? LeBlanc. Camera crew from New Orleans Channel 6 wants to film the "Cajun National Anthem" and dancing. Dewey introduces the band: Ervine "Dick" Richard (fiddle (also plays steel guitar)), Nonc Allie Young from Basile (accordion and store owner), Rodney Balfa (guitar and vocals; brick layer)
14:02 - Jolie blonde
18:27 - Les flammes d'enfer
22:36 - La valse criminelle
28:34 - Diggy Diggy Lo in G
32:20 - Intro to "Tous les soirs." Traveling to university in the north and finding out it's not originally a Cajun song, but an English tune called "My Conscience is Clear"; Tous les soirs
39:20 - Parlez-nous à boire
43:34 - Colinda. Many people believe Colinda is a name of a girl, but it's actually a type of dance that the old women didn't want their daughters to dance to
46:58 - Les barres de la prison. (Barry Ancelet on vocals?)

***Only year was included in original notes, no specific month or day

Language: 
English
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Ancelet
Subject: 
Louisiana; Cajun; Folk music; accordion; violin; fiddle; Festivals
Creator: 
Barry Jean Ancelet
Informants: 
Balfa Brothers with Allie Young and Ervin "Dick" Richard
Recording date: 
Wednesday, January 5, 1977
Coverage Spatial: 
Lafayette, LA (Thomas Park)
Publisher: 
Center for Louisiana Studies
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
48:47
Cataloged Date: 
Monday, June 5, 2017
Digitized Date: 
Tuesday, January 1, 2002
Original Format: 
Audio--Reel--7"
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore - Cabinet 1 Shelf 2

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